Week 3 forum | Psychology homework help

Week 3 forum | Psychology homework help

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ASSIGNMENT

 

Chomsky’s Theory of Language Development discusses “critical periods” for learning language.  Following from this theory, disruptions during critical periods should negatively affect the development of language. 

Unfortunately, there are some examples from real life to demonstrate this hypothesis.  Please link to and read the following regarding both a very recent and an historic case:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=4758945&page=1

Here are some additional, optional resources on Genie:

http://documentarystorm.com/secret-of-the-wild-child/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/transcripts/2112gchild.html

Obviously, these are both horrific cases of child abuse.

1.)  What does “Genie’s” final outcome tell us about language (and emotional) development? 

2.)  What cues can educators take from these tragic cases?

Introduction

This lesson will explore the emotional and communication development of children. Firstly, we will discuss the theories of emotional development. We will then look at how emotion develops in two main stages: primary emotions which include joy, anger and fear, and secondary emotions which comprise the self-conscious emotions. We will then move onto attachment theory where we investigate how the different kinds of caregiver-infant relationships either create secure or insecure attachments, and the impact of these attachments on child development. In the second part of the lesson, we will explore language and communication development. We will cover how this development is socially facilitated, as well as the components of language and communication. Lastly, we will discuss the social use of language.

Emotional Development

‹›

· Emotions

Emotions have many important functions and have a significant impact on child development. Emotions are internal responses to the environment, that are accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes. For instance, sadness may be accompanied by a change in heart rate and release of cortisol, a stress hormone. Learning how to interpret other’s emotions is also a key aspect of development.

Development of Emotional Expression

While most mothers agree that they can detect emotions in the first month of their baby’s life (Johnson, Emde, Pannabecker, Stenberg, & Davis, 1982), the Maximally Discriminative Facial Movement (MAX) coding system developed by Izard, Fantauzzo, Castle, Haynes and Slomine (1995), determines infant emotions based on their body movements and facial expressions.

PRIMARY EMOTIONS

JOY

GENDER AND NATIONALITY DIFFERENCES

LAUGHING

Fear and Other Emotions

· FEAR

· STRANGER DISTRESS

· INTERACTIONS

· OTHER EMOTIONS

Fear is the second predominant primary emotion. Fear of strangers emerges around the same time that infants begin to show positive emotion to familiar people. According to Sroufe (1996), at around three months, infants begin to be wary when they are exposed to new situations because they have difficulty assimilating and comprehending the unfamiliar. From around seven months, this wariness turns into outright fear and distress.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Please select the two correct statements that refute the genetic-maturational perspective’s argument that biological factors determine how children react and regulate their emotions.

  

The   rate of infant smiling is related to the rate of caregiver stimulation.

 

Babies   begin to smile at 46 weeks from conception, whether they were born premature   or full-term.

 

Stranger   distress is not universal since it does not occur in cultures in which   caregiving is shared among multiple relatives.

 

From   about eight weeks, babies begin to look a lot at the mouth and respond to   smiles.

I don’t know

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Secondary Emotions

Secondary emotions function to identify and coordinate the role of the individual’s responsibility in a situation that involves other factors and/or people. Secondary emotion are self-conscious emotions that describe the individual’s perception of their relatively superior or inferior position. Secondary emotions emerge from around the second year (Saarni et al., 2006).

Emotional reactions differ from child to child, and are a consequence of temperament and environmental factors – particularly parental modeling. High negative emotionality results in more adjustment difficulties, depression and behavioral problems, while children with positive emotionality have high self-esteem, social competence and less adjustment issues.

PRIDE AND SHAME

GUILT

JEALOUSY

JEALOUSY OF PARENTAL ATTENTION

Identifying Emotions in Others

Infants initially learn to interpret other’s emotions by observing caregiver facial expressions. Research suggests that babies recognize caregiver joy before they are able to recognize anger – similar to how babies first express joy and only later express anger (Izard et al., 1995). As children get older, they more accurately discern between genuine and inauthentic smiles (Del Giudice & Colle, 2007).

Experiences Impact Emotions

Children’s early experiences impact their ability to recognize emotions. For example, children who have experienced high levels of threat and hostility recognize anger more quickly and sadness more slowly than other children (Pollak & Sinha, 2002). Children from cultures that value group harmony and focus on other’s feelings, such as China and Mexico, are more capable than Australian and U.S. children at recognizing other’s emotions (Cole & Tan, 2007).

Emotional Regulation

· SELF-REGULATION

· EMOTIONAL RULES

· CONFLICTING EMOTIONS

· FAMILY ROLE

An important facet of development is learning to regulate and take control of one’s emotional expression. Infants learn that sucking their thumbs is soothing, while older children learn to avoid frightening situations and distract themselves. As children grow up, increased self-control modulates the intensity, frequency and variability of their emotions, and predicts later adjustment (Fox & Calkins, 2003; Saarni et al., 2006). For example, it is normal for two-year olds to have tantrums, but tantrums in older children and adults are not considered normal or healthy.

Watch this video on early childhood self-regulation.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Caregivers have the following two responsibilities:

  

To   help children understand and speak about their own and other’s emotions.

 

To   make their babies smile as often as possible because this shows that the baby   is happy and healthy.

 

To   ensure children never experience negative emotions like jealousy, shame and   fear, because negative emotions impact development.

 

To   ensure that parent-child and parent-parent relationships in the home are   supportive and cooperative.

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Attachment

Attachment is the emotional bond between the infant and caregivers, and is foundational to the rest of the child’s development. Psychoanalytic and learning theory associate attachment with the satisfaction of the infant’s primary drive of hunger. The cognitive developmental view proposes that attachment teaches infants that others continue to exist even when they cannot be seen. The ethological perspective describes that children and caregivers are biologically programmed to respond to each other and develop a mutual attachment.

Attachment processes continue into adolescence, and determine how adolescents gain independence, form relationships with others and perceive the world. Furthermore, these patterns are generally repeated with our own children when we become parents. This is referred to as intergenerational continuity.

Some people are resilient enough to overcome dysfunctional attachments, and develop secure, satisfying relationships with their spouses and children. These people are referred to as earned secure individuals (Paley, Cox, Burchinal, & Payne, 1999). Professional help can improve parent-child relationships.

SECURE BASE

SECURE ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-AVOIDANT ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-RESISTANT ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-DISORGANIZED ATTACHMENT

Impact Of Attachment on Development

· ATTACHMENT

· ATTACHMENT AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

· SENSE OF SELF

· DAYCARE

How do you think neural plasticity and the quality of attachment relate?

Research shows that attachments to both mother and father are equally important (Parke & Buriel, 2006). Secure attachment, caregiver responsiveness and good parent-child relationships are related to more complex cognitive development and higher academic achievement and participation (Jacobsen & Hofmann 1997; Stams, Juffer, & van Ijzendoorn, 2002).

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Please select the correct statement.

  

Children   with insecure-disorganized attachment are probably angry with their   caregiver’s inconsistent availability.

 

Caregivers   who are unavailable, inconsistent, intrusive, or frightening tend to create   attachment dysfunction in children.

 

Children   who are sent to daycare are more prone to attachment disorders.

 

Children   who have attachment disorders will probably never be able to form healthy   relationships.

I don’t know

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Language and Communication

While humans are genetically predisposed to learning language, social support is crucial when children learn to speak and communicate. Language is a complex system of rules that allows us to send messages to one another through words, symbols and behaviors. We use it to relate, express ourselves, influence, inform others and achieve goals. Language is important to teach children how to regulate their emotions, control their actions and organize their thinking (Parke & Gauvain, 2009).

Communication competence allows children to express themselves in meaningful and culturally relevant ways. Communication is a two-way process, whereby productive language refers to the production of communication, while receptive language refers to understanding other’s communication.

PHONOLOGY

SEMANTICS

GRAMMAR

PRAGMATICS

Language Development Theories

We will explore each of these components in more detail, but first, we will discuss the theories of language development.

· LEARNING PERSPECTIVE

· NATIVIST PERSPECTIVE

· INTERACTIONIST PERSPECTIVE

The learning perspective proposes that children learn language through caregivers who positively reinforce infant babbling that most sounds like speech, and because children learn through imitating and generalizing what they observe and hear from others.

Facilitating Language Development

‹›

· Language Acquisition Support System (LASS)

The language acquisition support system (LASS) is the environment provided by caregivers and other people like siblings, in which children learn language (Bruner, 1983). Nonverbal games such as peekaboo have predictable patterns which may lay the foundation for language and communication rules – for example, turn-taking. Parents and siblings usually talk to the child throughout these games, commenting on the child’s actions and what is occurring, and anticipating the child’s needs, thus laying the foundation for language.

Antecedents of Language

· PRELINGUISTIC COMMUNICATION

· RHYTHMIC ORGANIZATION

· CRYING, BABBLING, AND COOING

· CULTURAL CONSISTENCIES

Since communication is more than just verbal language, prelinguistic communication such as facial expressions, gestures and movement are important precursors (Adamson, 1995). From three months, infants begin to respond to caregivers with smiles, movements, sounds and gestures, from six months they begin to make pointing gestures at objects and from one year they can follow someone else’s pointing gesture (Fogel, 1993).

Semantic Development

Children understand more than they are able to express. One-and-a-half-year olds typically understand between 50 to100 words and begin to say their first words. Two-year olds understand around 900 words, and six-year olds understand around 8000 words. This increase in vocabulary is referred to as the naming explosion (Bloom, Lifter & Broughton, 1985).

Children learn object words first, probably because it is easier to understand the relationship between the object, concept and word, than understanding actions and abstract concepts (Gentner, 1982). Action words are more easily learnt when it is an action the child can perform, such as running and jumping. Overextension of words occurs when one word is used for many objects. For instance, all animals may be referred to as cat. Underextension occurs when a word is used in a very limited way, for instance if the word cat is used to identify only black cats.

Grammar

The child’s leap from using single words to full sentences is rapid. Children begin to communicate by using single words that seem to communicate full ideas – for example, if a child says ‘me’ the parent may realize the child is really saying ‘I want to do this myself’. This is referred to as a holophrase.

· TWO-YEAR OLDS

· THREE-YEAR OLDS

Two-year olds begin to use telegraphic speech or two-word sentences that contain only the words needed to convey the intended meaning – usually nouns, adjectives and verbs. For example, ‘me play’. This also occurs in two-year olds who use sign language. At this stage, children learn about the correct plural forms, and may overgeneralize rules they have learned. For instance, the plural form -s may be applied to all words: ‘mouses’ instead of ‘mice.’

Learning the Social Use of Language

Since language functions to help us express ourselves, and influence and relate to others, it is a social phenomenon. Pragmatics are thus crucial rules about what kind of communication is appropriate in specific situations.

Children generally begin to learn the first, second and third rules by around the age of two (Dunn, 1988; Wellman & Lempers, 1977). Miller and Sperry (1987) add that children need to learn how, where, when and to whom to express negative feelings such as anger and sadness. As with other social skills, children learn pragmatics from observation, listening, imitation and instruction.

According to Glucksberg, Kraus & Higgins (1975), children must learn the following pragmatics respectively:

RULE 1

RULE 2

RULE 3

RULE 4

RULE 5

RULE 6

Bilingualism

· BILINGUAL HOMES

· NOT A DETRIMENT

· COMPETENCE IN BOTH

Many children grow up learning two languages. In some cases, children learn two languages simultaneously, where perhaps one parent speaks to the child in one language, while the other parent speaks to the child in another language. In other cases, languages may be learned sequentially, where the first language is learned at home and the second at school.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Which of the following utterances is most typical of a two-year old?

  

Apple.

 

Mommy!   Sweetie me.

 

Mommy   doesn’t understand me.

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Conclusion

In this lesson, we covered the emotional development of children, attachment theory and the development of language and communication in children. We began the lesson by discussing the theoretical approaches to emotional development, and then moved on to exploring the development of emotional expression, where we discussed primary and secondary emotions, and emotional regulation. We then investigated how the caregiving style impacts the quality of attachment between children and caregivers, and the impact attachment has on child development. Thereafter, we looked at language and communication development. We briefly explored the main language development theories, and then looked at how language development can be facilitated. Lastly, we looked at the components of language and how they come together to be used socially.

KEY TERMS

References

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Ainsworth, M. D. (1973). The development of infant-mother attachment. In B. Caldwell & H. Ricciuti (Eds.), Review of child development research (Vol. 3, pp. 1–94). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Bialystok, E. (1999). Cognitive complexity and attentional control in the bilingual mind. Child Development, 70, 636–644.

Bloom, L., Lifter, K., & Broughton, J. (1985). The convergence of early cognition and language in the second year of life: Problems in conceptualization and measurement. In M. Barrett (Ed.), Single word speech (pp. 149–181). London, UK: Wiley.

Bruner, J. (1983). Children’s talk. New York, NY: Norton.

Clarke-Stewart, K. A., & Allhusen, V. D. (2002). Nonparental caregiving. In M. Bornstein (Ed.), Handbook of parenting (2nd ed., pp. 215–252). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Cole, P. M., & Tan, P. Z. (2007). Emotion socialization from a cultural perspective. In J. E. Grusec & P. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization (pp. 516–542). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Contreras, J. M., Kerns, K., Weimer, B. L., Gentzler, A. L., & Tomich, P. L. (2000). Emotional regulation as a mediator of association between mother-child attachment and peer relationships in middle childhood. Journal of Family Psychology, 14, 111–124.

Deacon, S. H., Wade-Woolley, L., & Kirby, J. (2007). Crossover: The role of morphological awareness in French immersion children’s reading. Developmental Psychology, 43, 732–746.

Del Giudice, M., & Colle, L. (2007). Differences between children and adults in the recognition of enjoyment smiles. Developmental Psychology, 43, 796–803.

Denham, S. A., Bassett, H. H., & Wyatt, T. (2007). The socialization of emotional competence. In J. E. Grusec, & P. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization (pp. 516–542). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

de Villiers, P. A., & de Villiers, J. G. (1992). Language development. In M. E. Lamb & M. H. Bornstein (Eds.), Developmental psychology: An advanced textbook (3rd ed., pp. 313–373). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Diaz, R. M. (1985). Bilingual cognitive development: Addressing three gaps in current research. Child Development, 56, 1376–1388.

Dittrichova, J. (1969). The development of premature infants. In R. J. Robinson (Ed.), Brain and early development. London, UK: Academic Press.

Dunn, J. (1988). The beginnings of social understanding. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Feinman, S., & Lewis, M. (1983). Social referencing at ten months: A second-order effect on infants’ responses to strangers. Child Development, 54, 878–887.

Fogel, A. (1993). Developing through relationships: Origins of communication, self, and culture. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Fox, N. A., & Calkins, S. (2003). The development of self-control of emotions: Intrinsic and external influences. Motivation and Emotion, 27, 7–26.

Gentner, D. (1982). Why nouns are learned before verbs: Linguistic relativity versus natural partitioning. In S. A. Kuczaj II (Ed.), Language development: Vol. 2. Language, thought, and culture (pp. 301–332). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Glucksberg, S., Krauss, R., & Higgins, E. T. (1975). The development of referential communication skills. In F. D. Horowitz (Ed.), Review of child development research (Vol. 4, pp. 305–345). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Goncz, L., & Kodzopeljic, J. (1991). Exposure to two languages in the preschool period: Metalinguistic development and the acquisition of reading. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 12, 137–142.

Harter, S., & Buddin, B. J. (1987). Children’s understanding of the simultaneity of two emotions: A five-stage developmental acquisition sequence. Developmental Psychology, 23, 388–399.

Harter, S. (2006). The self. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (6th ed., Vol. 3, pp. 505–570). New York, NY: Wiley.

Izard, C. E., Fantauzzo, C. A., Castle, J. M., Haynes, O. M., & Slomine, B. S. (1995). The morphological stability and social validity of infants’ facial expressions. Unpublished manuscript, University of Delaware.

Jacobsen, T., & Hofmann, V. (1997). Children’s attachment representations: Longitudinal relations to school behavior and academic competency in middle childhood and adolescence. Developmental Psychology, 33, 703–710.

Johnson, W., Emde, R. N., Pannabecker, B., Stenberg, C., & Davis, M. (1982). Maternal perception of infant emotion from birth through 18 months. Infant Behaviorand Development, 5 , 313–322.

LaFrance, M., Hecht, M. A., & Levy Paluck, E. (2003). The contingent smile: A meta-analysis of sex differences in smiling. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 305–334.

Lewis, M. (2000). Self-conscious emotions: Embarrassment, pride, shame, and guilt. In M. Lewis & J. Haviland (Eds.), Handbook of emotions (2nd ed., pp. 623–636). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Lewis, M., Alessandri, S., & Sullivan, M. W. (1992). Differences in shame and pride as a function of children’s gender and task difficulty. Child Development, 63, 630–638.

Lewis, M., & Michalson, L. (1985). Children’s emotions and moods. New York, NY: Plenum Press.

Mangelsdorf, S., Watkins, S., & Lehn, L. (1991, April). The role of control in the infant’s appraisal of strangers. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, Washington.

Miller, P., & Sperry, L. L. (1987). The socialization of anger and aggression. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 33, 1–31.

Morgan, G. A., & Ricciuti, H. (1969). Infants’ responses to strangers during the first year. In B. M. Foss (Ed.), Determinants of infant behavior (Vol. 4, pp. 253–272). London, UK: Methuen.

Paley, B., Cox, M. J., Burchinal, M. R., & Payne, C. C. (1999). Attachment and family functioning: Comparison of spouses with continuous-secure, earned-secure, dismissing and preoccupied attachment stances. Journal of Family Psychology, 13, 580–597.

Parke, R., & Buriel, R. (2006). Socialization in the family: Ethnic and ecological perspectives. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 3. Social, emotional and personality development (6th ed., pp. 429–504). New York, NY: Wiley.

Parke, R., & Gauvain, M. (2009).Child Psychology: A contemporary viewpoint  (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Pearson, B. Z., Fernandez, S. C., Lewedeg, V., & Oller, D. K. (1997). The relation of input factors of lexical learning by bilingual infants (ages 8 to 30 months). Applied Psycholinguistics, 18, 41–58.

Pearson, B. Z., Fernandez, S. C., & Oller, D. K. (1993). Lexical development in bilingual infants and toddlers: Comparison to monolingual norms. Language Learning, 43, 93–120.

Petitto, L. A., & Marentette, P. (1991). Babbling in the manual mode: Evidence for the ontogeny of language. Science, 251, 1493–1496.

Pollak, S. D., & Sinha, P. (2002). Effects of early experience on children’s recognition of facial displays of emotion. Developmental Psychology, 38, 784–791.

Saarni, C., Campos, J. J., & Camras, L. (2006). Emotional development. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.). Handbook of child psychology: Vol 3. Social, emotional, and personality development (6th ed., pp. 226–299). New York, NY: Wiley.

Schneider, B. H., Atkinson, L., & Tardif, C. (2001). Child-parent attachment and children’s peer relations: A quantitative review. Developmental Psychology, 37, 86–100.

Sokolov, J. L. (1993). A local contingency analysis of the fine-tuning hypothesis. Developmental Psychology, 29, 1008–1023.

Sroufe, L. A. (1996). Emotional development: The organization of emotional life in the early years. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Sroufe, L. A., Waters, E., & Matas, L. (1974). Contextual determinants of infant affectional response. In M. Lewis & L. Rosenblum (Eds.), Origins of fear (pp. 49–72). New York, NY: Wiley.

Stams, G. J. M., Juffer, F., & van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (2002). Maternal sensitivity, infant attachment and temperament in early childhood predict adjustment in middle childhood: The case of adopted children and their biologically unrelated parents. Developmental Psychology, 38, 806–821.

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Tronick, E. Z., Messinger, D. S., Weinberg, M. K., Lester, B. M., LaGasse, L., Seifer, R., et al. (2005). Cocaine exposure is associated with subtle compromises of infants’ and mothers’ social-emotional behavior and dyadic features of their interaction in the face still face paradigm. Developmental Psychology, 41, 711–722.

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Week 3 forum | Psychology homework help

  

ASSIGNMENT

 

Chomsky’s Theory of Language Development discusses “critical periods” for learning language.  Following from this theory, disruptions during critical periods should negatively affect the development of language. 

Unfortunately, there are some examples from real life to demonstrate this hypothesis.  Please link to and read the following regarding both a very recent and an historic case:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=4758945&page=1

Here are some additional, optional resources on Genie:

http://documentarystorm.com/secret-of-the-wild-child/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/transcripts/2112gchild.html

Obviously, these are both horrific cases of child abuse.

1.)  What does “Genie’s” final outcome tell us about language (and emotional) development? 

2.)  What cues can educators take from these tragic cases?

Introduction

This lesson will explore the emotional and communication development of children. Firstly, we will discuss the theories of emotional development. We will then look at how emotion develops in two main stages: primary emotions which include joy, anger and fear, and secondary emotions which comprise the self-conscious emotions. We will then move onto attachment theory where we investigate how the different kinds of caregiver-infant relationships either create secure or insecure attachments, and the impact of these attachments on child development. In the second part of the lesson, we will explore language and communication development. We will cover how this development is socially facilitated, as well as the components of language and communication. Lastly, we will discuss the social use of language.

Emotional Development

‹›

· Emotions

Emotions have many important functions and have a significant impact on child development. Emotions are internal responses to the environment, that are accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes. For instance, sadness may be accompanied by a change in heart rate and release of cortisol, a stress hormone. Learning how to interpret other’s emotions is also a key aspect of development.

Development of Emotional Expression

While most mothers agree that they can detect emotions in the first month of their baby’s life (Johnson, Emde, Pannabecker, Stenberg, & Davis, 1982), the Maximally Discriminative Facial Movement (MAX) coding system developed by Izard, Fantauzzo, Castle, Haynes and Slomine (1995), determines infant emotions based on their body movements and facial expressions.

PRIMARY EMOTIONS

JOY

GENDER AND NATIONALITY DIFFERENCES

LAUGHING

Fear and Other Emotions

· FEAR

· STRANGER DISTRESS

· INTERACTIONS

· OTHER EMOTIONS

Fear is the second predominant primary emotion. Fear of strangers emerges around the same time that infants begin to show positive emotion to familiar people. According to Sroufe (1996), at around three months, infants begin to be wary when they are exposed to new situations because they have difficulty assimilating and comprehending the unfamiliar. From around seven months, this wariness turns into outright fear and distress.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Please select the two correct statements that refute the genetic-maturational perspective’s argument that biological factors determine how children react and regulate their emotions.

  

The   rate of infant smiling is related to the rate of caregiver stimulation.

 

Babies   begin to smile at 46 weeks from conception, whether they were born premature   or full-term.

 

Stranger   distress is not universal since it does not occur in cultures in which   caregiving is shared among multiple relatives.

 

From   about eight weeks, babies begin to look a lot at the mouth and respond to   smiles.

I don’t know

One attempt

Submit answer

You answered 0 out of 0 correctly. Asking up to 1.

Secondary Emotions

Secondary emotions function to identify and coordinate the role of the individual’s responsibility in a situation that involves other factors and/or people. Secondary emotion are self-conscious emotions that describe the individual’s perception of their relatively superior or inferior position. Secondary emotions emerge from around the second year (Saarni et al., 2006).

Emotional reactions differ from child to child, and are a consequence of temperament and environmental factors – particularly parental modeling. High negative emotionality results in more adjustment difficulties, depression and behavioral problems, while children with positive emotionality have high self-esteem, social competence and less adjustment issues.

PRIDE AND SHAME

GUILT

JEALOUSY

JEALOUSY OF PARENTAL ATTENTION

Identifying Emotions in Others

Infants initially learn to interpret other’s emotions by observing caregiver facial expressions. Research suggests that babies recognize caregiver joy before they are able to recognize anger – similar to how babies first express joy and only later express anger (Izard et al., 1995). As children get older, they more accurately discern between genuine and inauthentic smiles (Del Giudice & Colle, 2007).

Experiences Impact Emotions

Children’s early experiences impact their ability to recognize emotions. For example, children who have experienced high levels of threat and hostility recognize anger more quickly and sadness more slowly than other children (Pollak & Sinha, 2002). Children from cultures that value group harmony and focus on other’s feelings, such as China and Mexico, are more capable than Australian and U.S. children at recognizing other’s emotions (Cole & Tan, 2007).

Emotional Regulation

· SELF-REGULATION

· EMOTIONAL RULES

· CONFLICTING EMOTIONS

· FAMILY ROLE

An important facet of development is learning to regulate and take control of one’s emotional expression. Infants learn that sucking their thumbs is soothing, while older children learn to avoid frightening situations and distract themselves. As children grow up, increased self-control modulates the intensity, frequency and variability of their emotions, and predicts later adjustment (Fox & Calkins, 2003; Saarni et al., 2006). For example, it is normal for two-year olds to have tantrums, but tantrums in older children and adults are not considered normal or healthy.

Watch this video on early childhood self-regulation.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Caregivers have the following two responsibilities:

  

To   help children understand and speak about their own and other’s emotions.

 

To   make their babies smile as often as possible because this shows that the baby   is happy and healthy.

 

To   ensure children never experience negative emotions like jealousy, shame and   fear, because negative emotions impact development.

 

To   ensure that parent-child and parent-parent relationships in the home are   supportive and cooperative.

I don’t know

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Attachment

Attachment is the emotional bond between the infant and caregivers, and is foundational to the rest of the child’s development. Psychoanalytic and learning theory associate attachment with the satisfaction of the infant’s primary drive of hunger. The cognitive developmental view proposes that attachment teaches infants that others continue to exist even when they cannot be seen. The ethological perspective describes that children and caregivers are biologically programmed to respond to each other and develop a mutual attachment.

Attachment processes continue into adolescence, and determine how adolescents gain independence, form relationships with others and perceive the world. Furthermore, these patterns are generally repeated with our own children when we become parents. This is referred to as intergenerational continuity.

Some people are resilient enough to overcome dysfunctional attachments, and develop secure, satisfying relationships with their spouses and children. These people are referred to as earned secure individuals (Paley, Cox, Burchinal, & Payne, 1999). Professional help can improve parent-child relationships.

SECURE BASE

SECURE ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-AVOIDANT ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-RESISTANT ATTACHMENT

INSECURE-DISORGANIZED ATTACHMENT

Impact Of Attachment on Development

· ATTACHMENT

· ATTACHMENT AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

· SENSE OF SELF

· DAYCARE

How do you think neural plasticity and the quality of attachment relate?

Research shows that attachments to both mother and father are equally important (Parke & Buriel, 2006). Secure attachment, caregiver responsiveness and good parent-child relationships are related to more complex cognitive development and higher academic achievement and participation (Jacobsen & Hofmann 1997; Stams, Juffer, & van Ijzendoorn, 2002).

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Please select the correct statement.

  

Children   with insecure-disorganized attachment are probably angry with their   caregiver’s inconsistent availability.

 

Caregivers   who are unavailable, inconsistent, intrusive, or frightening tend to create   attachment dysfunction in children.

 

Children   who are sent to daycare are more prone to attachment disorders.

 

Children   who have attachment disorders will probably never be able to form healthy   relationships.

I don’t know

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Language and Communication

While humans are genetically predisposed to learning language, social support is crucial when children learn to speak and communicate. Language is a complex system of rules that allows us to send messages to one another through words, symbols and behaviors. We use it to relate, express ourselves, influence, inform others and achieve goals. Language is important to teach children how to regulate their emotions, control their actions and organize their thinking (Parke & Gauvain, 2009).

Communication competence allows children to express themselves in meaningful and culturally relevant ways. Communication is a two-way process, whereby productive language refers to the production of communication, while receptive language refers to understanding other’s communication.

PHONOLOGY

SEMANTICS

GRAMMAR

PRAGMATICS

Language Development Theories

We will explore each of these components in more detail, but first, we will discuss the theories of language development.

· LEARNING PERSPECTIVE

· NATIVIST PERSPECTIVE

· INTERACTIONIST PERSPECTIVE

The learning perspective proposes that children learn language through caregivers who positively reinforce infant babbling that most sounds like speech, and because children learn through imitating and generalizing what they observe and hear from others.

Facilitating Language Development

‹›

· Language Acquisition Support System (LASS)

The language acquisition support system (LASS) is the environment provided by caregivers and other people like siblings, in which children learn language (Bruner, 1983). Nonverbal games such as peekaboo have predictable patterns which may lay the foundation for language and communication rules – for example, turn-taking. Parents and siblings usually talk to the child throughout these games, commenting on the child’s actions and what is occurring, and anticipating the child’s needs, thus laying the foundation for language.

Antecedents of Language

· PRELINGUISTIC COMMUNICATION

· RHYTHMIC ORGANIZATION

· CRYING, BABBLING, AND COOING

· CULTURAL CONSISTENCIES

Since communication is more than just verbal language, prelinguistic communication such as facial expressions, gestures and movement are important precursors (Adamson, 1995). From three months, infants begin to respond to caregivers with smiles, movements, sounds and gestures, from six months they begin to make pointing gestures at objects and from one year they can follow someone else’s pointing gesture (Fogel, 1993).

Semantic Development

Children understand more than they are able to express. One-and-a-half-year olds typically understand between 50 to100 words and begin to say their first words. Two-year olds understand around 900 words, and six-year olds understand around 8000 words. This increase in vocabulary is referred to as the naming explosion (Bloom, Lifter & Broughton, 1985).

Children learn object words first, probably because it is easier to understand the relationship between the object, concept and word, than understanding actions and abstract concepts (Gentner, 1982). Action words are more easily learnt when it is an action the child can perform, such as running and jumping. Overextension of words occurs when one word is used for many objects. For instance, all animals may be referred to as cat. Underextension occurs when a word is used in a very limited way, for instance if the word cat is used to identify only black cats.

Grammar

The child’s leap from using single words to full sentences is rapid. Children begin to communicate by using single words that seem to communicate full ideas – for example, if a child says ‘me’ the parent may realize the child is really saying ‘I want to do this myself’. This is referred to as a holophrase.

· TWO-YEAR OLDS

· THREE-YEAR OLDS

Two-year olds begin to use telegraphic speech or two-word sentences that contain only the words needed to convey the intended meaning – usually nouns, adjectives and verbs. For example, ‘me play’. This also occurs in two-year olds who use sign language. At this stage, children learn about the correct plural forms, and may overgeneralize rules they have learned. For instance, the plural form -s may be applied to all words: ‘mouses’ instead of ‘mice.’

Learning the Social Use of Language

Since language functions to help us express ourselves, and influence and relate to others, it is a social phenomenon. Pragmatics are thus crucial rules about what kind of communication is appropriate in specific situations.

Children generally begin to learn the first, second and third rules by around the age of two (Dunn, 1988; Wellman & Lempers, 1977). Miller and Sperry (1987) add that children need to learn how, where, when and to whom to express negative feelings such as anger and sadness. As with other social skills, children learn pragmatics from observation, listening, imitation and instruction.

According to Glucksberg, Kraus & Higgins (1975), children must learn the following pragmatics respectively:

RULE 1

RULE 2

RULE 3

RULE 4

RULE 5

RULE 6

Bilingualism

· BILINGUAL HOMES

· NOT A DETRIMENT

· COMPETENCE IN BOTH

Many children grow up learning two languages. In some cases, children learn two languages simultaneously, where perhaps one parent speaks to the child in one language, while the other parent speaks to the child in another language. In other cases, languages may be learned sequentially, where the first language is learned at home and the second at school.

Knowledge Check

1

Question 1

Which of the following utterances is most typical of a two-year old?

  

Apple.

 

Mommy!   Sweetie me.

 

Mommy   doesn’t understand me.

I don’t know

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Conclusion

In this lesson, we covered the emotional development of children, attachment theory and the development of language and communication in children. We began the lesson by discussing the theoretical approaches to emotional development, and then moved on to exploring the development of emotional expression, where we discussed primary and secondary emotions, and emotional regulation. We then investigated how the caregiving style impacts the quality of attachment between children and caregivers, and the impact attachment has on child development. Thereafter, we looked at language and communication development. We briefly explored the main language development theories, and then looked at how language development can be facilitated. Lastly, we looked at the components of language and how they come together to be used socially.

KEY TERMS

References

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Ainsworth, M. D. (1973). The development of infant-mother attachment. In B. Caldwell & H. Ricciuti (Eds.), Review of child development research (Vol. 3, pp. 1–94). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Bialystok, E. (1999). Cognitive complexity and attentional control in the bilingual mind. Child Development, 70, 636–644.

Bloom, L., Lifter, K., & Broughton, J. (1985). The convergence of early cognition and language in the second year of life: Problems in conceptualization and measurement. In M. Barrett (Ed.), Single word speech (pp. 149–181). London, UK: Wiley.

Bruner, J. (1983). Children’s talk. New York, NY: Norton.

Clarke-Stewart, K. A., & Allhusen, V. D. (2002). Nonparental caregiving. In M. Bornstein (Ed.), Handbook of parenting (2nd ed., pp. 215–252). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Cole, P. M., & Tan, P. Z. (2007). Emotion socialization from a cultural perspective. In J. E. Grusec & P. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization (pp. 516–542). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Contreras, J. M., Kerns, K., Weimer, B. L., Gentzler, A. L., & Tomich, P. L. (2000). Emotional regulation as a mediator of association between mother-child attachment and peer relationships in middle childhood. Journal of Family Psychology, 14, 111–124.

Deacon, S. H., Wade-Woolley, L., & Kirby, J. (2007). Crossover: The role of morphological awareness in French immersion children’s reading. Developmental Psychology, 43, 732–746.

Del Giudice, M., & Colle, L. (2007). Differences between children and adults in the recognition of enjoyment smiles. Developmental Psychology, 43, 796–803.

Denham, S. A., Bassett, H. H., & Wyatt, T. (2007). The socialization of emotional competence. In J. E. Grusec, & P. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization (pp. 516–542). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

de Villiers, P. A., & de Villiers, J. G. (1992). Language development. In M. E. Lamb & M. H. Bornstein (Eds.), Developmental psychology: An advanced textbook (3rd ed., pp. 313–373). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Diaz, R. M. (1985). Bilingual cognitive development: Addressing three gaps in current research. Child Development, 56, 1376–1388.

Dittrichova, J. (1969). The development of premature infants. In R. J. Robinson (Ed.), Brain and early development. London, UK: Academic Press.

Dunn, J. (1988). The beginnings of social understanding. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Feinman, S., & Lewis, M. (1983). Social referencing at ten months: A second-order effect on infants’ responses to strangers. Child Development, 54, 878–887.

Fogel, A. (1993). Developing through relationships: Origins of communication, self, and culture. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Fox, N. A., & Calkins, S. (2003). The development of self-control of emotions: Intrinsic and external influences. Motivation and Emotion, 27, 7–26.

Gentner, D. (1982). Why nouns are learned before verbs: Linguistic relativity versus natural partitioning. In S. A. Kuczaj II (Ed.), Language development: Vol. 2. Language, thought, and culture (pp. 301–332). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Glucksberg, S., Krauss, R., & Higgins, E. T. (1975). The development of referential communication skills. In F. D. Horowitz (Ed.), Review of child development research (Vol. 4, pp. 305–345). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Goncz, L., & Kodzopeljic, J. (1991). Exposure to two languages in the preschool period: Metalinguistic development and the acquisition of reading. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 12, 137–142.

Harter, S., & Buddin, B. J. (1987). Children’s understanding of the simultaneity of two emotions: A five-stage developmental acquisition sequence. Developmental Psychology, 23, 388–399.

Harter, S. (2006). The self. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (6th ed., Vol. 3, pp. 505–570). New York, NY: Wiley.

Izard, C. E., Fantauzzo, C. A., Castle, J. M., Haynes, O. M., & Slomine, B. S. (1995). The morphological stability and social validity of infants’ facial expressions. Unpublished manuscript, University of Delaware.

Jacobsen, T., & Hofmann, V. (1997). Children’s attachment representations: Longitudinal relations to school behavior and academic competency in middle childhood and adolescence. Developmental Psychology, 33, 703–710.

Johnson, W., Emde, R. N., Pannabecker, B., Stenberg, C., & Davis, M. (1982). Maternal perception of infant emotion from birth through 18 months. Infant Behaviorand Development, 5 , 313–322.

LaFrance, M., Hecht, M. A., & Levy Paluck, E. (2003). The contingent smile: A meta-analysis of sex differences in smiling. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 305–334.

Lewis, M. (2000). Self-conscious emotions: Embarrassment, pride, shame, and guilt. In M. Lewis & J. Haviland (Eds.), Handbook of emotions (2nd ed., pp. 623–636). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Lewis, M., Alessandri, S., & Sullivan, M. W. (1992). Differences in shame and pride as a function of children’s gender and task difficulty. Child Development, 63, 630–638.

Lewis, M., & Michalson, L. (1985). Children’s emotions and moods. New York, NY: Plenum Press.

Mangelsdorf, S., Watkins, S., & Lehn, L. (1991, April). The role of control in the infant’s appraisal of strangers. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, Washington.

Miller, P., & Sperry, L. L. (1987). The socialization of anger and aggression. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 33, 1–31.

Morgan, G. A., & Ricciuti, H. (1969). Infants’ responses to strangers during the first year. In B. M. Foss (Ed.), Determinants of infant behavior (Vol. 4, pp. 253–272). London, UK: Methuen.

Paley, B., Cox, M. J., Burchinal, M. R., & Payne, C. C. (1999). Attachment and family functioning: Comparison of spouses with continuous-secure, earned-secure, dismissing and preoccupied attachment stances. Journal of Family Psychology, 13, 580–597.

Parke, R., & Buriel, R. (2006). Socialization in the family: Ethnic and ecological perspectives. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 3. Social, emotional and personality development (6th ed., pp. 429–504). New York, NY: Wiley.

Parke, R., & Gauvain, M. (2009).Child Psychology: A contemporary viewpoint  (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Pearson, B. Z., Fernandez, S. C., Lewedeg, V., & Oller, D. K. (1997). The relation of input factors of lexical learning by bilingual infants (ages 8 to 30 months). Applied Psycholinguistics, 18, 41–58.

Pearson, B. Z., Fernandez, S. C., & Oller, D. K. (1993). Lexical development in bilingual infants and toddlers: Comparison to monolingual norms. Language Learning, 43, 93–120.

Petitto, L. A., & Marentette, P. (1991). Babbling in the manual mode: Evidence for the ontogeny of language. Science, 251, 1493–1496.

Pollak, S. D., & Sinha, P. (2002). Effects of early experience on children’s recognition of facial displays of emotion. Developmental Psychology, 38, 784–791.

Saarni, C., Campos, J. J., & Camras, L. (2006). Emotional development. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.). Handbook of child psychology: Vol 3. Social, emotional, and personality development (6th ed., pp. 226–299). New York, NY: Wiley.

Schneider, B. H., Atkinson, L., & Tardif, C. (2001). Child-parent attachment and children’s peer relations: A quantitative review. Developmental Psychology, 37, 86–100.

Sokolov, J. L. (1993). A local contingency analysis of the fine-tuning hypothesis. Developmental Psychology, 29, 1008–1023.

Sroufe, L. A. (1996). Emotional development: The organization of emotional life in the early years. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Sroufe, L. A., Waters, E., & Matas, L. (1974). Contextual determinants of infant affectional response. In M. Lewis & L. Rosenblum (Eds.), Origins of fear (pp. 49–72). New York, NY: Wiley.

Stams, G. J. M., Juffer, F., & van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (2002). Maternal sensitivity, infant attachment and temperament in early childhood predict adjustment in middle childhood: The case of adopted children and their biologically unrelated parents. Developmental Psychology, 38, 806–821.

Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., Bornstein, M. H., & Baumwell, L. (2001). Maternal responsiveness and children’s achievement of language milestones. Child Development, 72, 748–767.

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Thompson, R. A. (2006). The development of the person: Social understanding, relationships, self, conscience. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (6th ed, Vol 3, pp. 24–98). New York, NY: Wiley.

Tomasello, M. (2006). Acquiring metalinguistic constructions. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Series Eds.), & D. Kuhn & R. Siegler (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of child psychology (Vol. 2, 6th ed., pp. 255–298). New York, NY: Wiley.

Tronick, E. Z., Messinger, D. S., Weinberg, M. K., Lester, B. M., LaGasse, L., Seifer, R., et al. (2005). Cocaine exposure is associated with subtle compromises of infants’ and mothers’ social-emotional behavior and dyadic features of their interaction in the face still face paradigm. Developmental Psychology, 41, 711–722.

Tronick, E. Z., Morelli, G. A., & Ivey, P. K. (1992). The Efe forager infant and toddler’s pattern of social relationships: Multiple and simultaneous. Developmental Psychology, 28, 568–577.

Volling, B. L., McElwain, N. L., & Miller, A. L. (2002). Emotion regulation in context: The jealousy complex between young siblings and its relations with child and family characteristics. Child Development, 73, 581–600.

Walden, T. (1991). Infant social referencing. In J. Garber & K. Dodge (Eds.), The development of emotional regulation and dysregulation (pp. 69–88). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Watamura, S. E., Donzella, B., Alwin, J., & Gunnar, M. R. (2003). Morning to afternoon increases in cortisol concentration for infants and toddlers at child care: Age differences and behavioral correlates. Child Development, 74, 1006–1020.

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New infection control program powerpoint | HA 415 | Kaplan University

New infection control program powerpoint | HA 415 | Kaplan University

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Unit outcomes addressed in this Assignment:

  • Describe how a healthcare system consists of organizational units and processes by which a society determines the choices concerning the production, consumption, and distribution of healthcare services.
  • Explain the role of a market-oriented health care system in providing necessary services.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of economic concepts within the healthcare sector.

Course outcomes assessed/addressed in this Assignment:

  • HA415-1: Explain policymaking and legal process that underpin the individual health care and public health systems.
  • GEL-6.06: Apply research to create original insights and/or solve real-world problems.
  • PC-2.2: Formulate innovative solutions for identified initiatives.

It is important to understand the process of how ideas become regulations and rules and how rules and regulations become policy and laws for healthcare facilities. Imagine yourself as a healthcare administrator for a large healthcare facility. You need to create an infection control program and training program for your facility. The spread of diseases and conditions like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in many healthcare facilities across the country highlights the urgent need for an infection control program and training program to implement your plan.

Instructions

Create a Powerpoint presentation to explain the new infection control and training program you will implement in your healthcare facility. The plan should include guidelines, information  and procedures for providing optimal infection control practices. The training program should be described and your plan to implement and monitor the success of the program. The program and training should highlight current best practices and demonstrate how the new program will adhere to state and national the rules and regulations in place for healthcare facility infection control. The PowerPoint should be easy to understand and include charts, graphs, pictures and/or animations to visually depict the points you are making in the presentation. You should draft explicit notes on paragraph form to expand on the points you are making on each slide. The slide content and notes sections should be professional, well organized, and logical to support your viewpoints and purpose clearly to your viewer/reader. The presentation should include at least 15 slides. The PowerPoint should include at least three references properly cited using APA and a references section at the end of the presentation.

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New infection control program powerpoint | HA 415 | Kaplan University

Unit outcomes addressed in this Assignment:

  • Describe how a healthcare system consists of organizational units and processes by which a society determines the choices concerning the production, consumption, and distribution of healthcare services.
  • Explain the role of a market-oriented health care system in providing necessary services.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of economic concepts within the healthcare sector.

Course outcomes assessed/addressed in this Assignment:

  • HA415-1: Explain policymaking and legal process that underpin the individual health care and public health systems.
  • GEL-6.06: Apply research to create original insights and/or solve real-world problems.
  • PC-2.2: Formulate innovative solutions for identified initiatives.

It is important to understand the process of how ideas become regulations and rules and how rules and regulations become policy and laws for healthcare facilities. Imagine yourself as a healthcare administrator for a large healthcare facility. You need to create an infection control program and training program for your facility. The spread of diseases and conditions like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in many healthcare facilities across the country highlights the urgent need for an infection control program and training program to implement your plan.

Instructions

Create a Powerpoint presentation to explain the new infection control and training program you will implement in your healthcare facility. The plan should include guidelines, information  and procedures for providing optimal infection control practices. The training program should be described and your plan to implement and monitor the success of the program. The program and training should highlight current best practices and demonstrate how the new program will adhere to state and national the rules and regulations in place for healthcare facility infection control. The PowerPoint should be easy to understand and include charts, graphs, pictures and/or animations to visually depict the points you are making in the presentation. You should draft explicit notes on paragraph form to expand on the points you are making on each slide. The slide content and notes sections should be professional, well organized, and logical to support your viewpoints and purpose clearly to your viewer/reader. The presentation should include at least 15 slides. The PowerPoint should include at least three references properly cited using APA and a references section at the end of the presentation.

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One page history essay responding to interview

One page history essay responding to interview

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!!! *NO PLAGIARISM* !!!

Read the following interview: An Ideal or a Justification: A conversation with David M. Pletcher, Indiana University

http://www.pbs.org/kera/usmexicanwar/prelude/md_an_ideal_or_a_justification.html

This article talks about the Ideal and the racist motives behind U.S. expansion. The ideal, for some, was that Christianity would spread and many would come to know Jesus. Matthew 28: 19 “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teach them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end for the age.”
For others, this scripture helped to justify Manifest Destiny and the racist motives behind subduing Native Americans.

*Debate the conflicting motivations between what the gospel charges believers to do and what believers actually did during U.S. expansion.*

Write your submission in a page essay in MLA format.

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One page history essay responding to interview

!!! *NO PLAGIARISM* !!!

Read the following interview: An Ideal or a Justification: A conversation with David M. Pletcher, Indiana University

http://www.pbs.org/kera/usmexicanwar/prelude/md_an_ideal_or_a_justification.html

This article talks about the Ideal and the racist motives behind U.S. expansion. The ideal, for some, was that Christianity would spread and many would come to know Jesus. Matthew 28: 19 “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teach them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end for the age.”
For others, this scripture helped to justify Manifest Destiny and the racist motives behind subduing Native Americans.

*Debate the conflicting motivations between what the gospel charges believers to do and what believers actually did during U.S. expansion.*

Write your submission in a page essay in MLA format.

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Religion- reflection paper 2 | English homework help

Religion- reflection paper 2 | English homework help

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Open the file (Instructions for Writing Reflection Papers) for instructions, then open the file (Question #2) to answer the questions after reading (The Problem of Evil) Also take a look at the file (PaperRubric) 

I NEED 3 COPIES FOR THIS ASSIGMENT FOR 3 STUDENTS WITH THE SAME TEACHER.

EACH ASSINGMENT HAVE TO BE 3 FULL PAGES

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Religion- reflection paper 2 | English homework help

Open the file (Instructions for Writing Reflection Papers) for instructions, then open the file (Question #2) to answer the questions after reading (The Problem of Evil) Also take a look at the file (PaperRubric) 

I NEED 3 COPIES FOR THIS ASSIGMENT FOR 3 STUDENTS WITH THE SAME TEACHER.

EACH ASSINGMENT HAVE TO BE 3 FULL PAGES

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Peer 6 | ART 101 Art Appreciation | Ashford University

Peer 6 | ART 101 Art Appreciation | Ashford University

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share another interesting component of the artwork or example of symbolism that was shared in the video that they have not yet addressed. You must provide a substantive response. 

PEERS RESPONSE: 

This week’s second discussion post we are to view a piece of artwork and discuss the key components of the work that were discussed in the interpretation provided by the video as well as mention the details regarding the methods, tools, subjects, and social implications of the art.  Then we will provide an example of symbolism and discuss the difference between the interpretation and our own impression. 

There were many components discussed in the interpretation.  The debate over this portrait is if was his wife and a wedding portrait.  There seems to be an event going on as he is waiving to others in the room that is highlighted in the reflection that is picked up in the mirror on the wall.  It is also signed by the artiest stating Van Eyck was here, like memorializing an event.  The discussion of light and technique of utilizing multiple layers of oil painting help create a vibrant ambiance as well as a love and appreciation of light that was popular in the times of the Northern renaissance.  The details of the intricate pictures within the picture may have been done by a single hair brush like the dog’s hair and the religious images that decorated the mirror.  The social implication of the artwork show that this couple is wealthy.  First off wealthy and important enough to have a portrait made, but the items in the portrait represent wealth.  The quality of clothing, the woven rug, breed of dog, oranges and their representation (Smarthistory, 2011) the marvelous chandelier with only one candle that also had religious implications.  All of these items show that the couple was wealthy.  One example of symbolism is the one candle that symbolized one higher power of God and its presence at this event being the only candle needed. 

The analysis versus my impression was a little different.  I did not pick up on the wealth aspect that the portrait was trying to portray.  I did notice the items but did not equate them with wealth.  I believed the woman to be pregnant, but in the break down it was a dress style of the times.  I also was not picking up on an event happening as I did not notice all the reflections in the mirror, but I noticed the uncomfortableness in the hand holding as he is holding the back of her hand.  I also noticed the lack of eye contact as they seems din engaged.  And the raising of his hand towards her as to stop her, My interpretation was of a couple that was not happy, that only had one candle, and lived in a small cramped area where the food was kept where they sleep.  I thought she was pregnant and he was possibly not happy about the situation.  After hearing the professionals discuss I can see I was way off.  

References:

Smarthistory. (2011, October 2). Van Eyck, portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his wife, 1434 (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/U38V_XwaRxM

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Peer 6 | ART 101 Art Appreciation | Ashford University

share another interesting component of the artwork or example of symbolism that was shared in the video that they have not yet addressed. You must provide a substantive response. 

PEERS RESPONSE: 

This week’s second discussion post we are to view a piece of artwork and discuss the key components of the work that were discussed in the interpretation provided by the video as well as mention the details regarding the methods, tools, subjects, and social implications of the art.  Then we will provide an example of symbolism and discuss the difference between the interpretation and our own impression. 

There were many components discussed in the interpretation.  The debate over this portrait is if was his wife and a wedding portrait.  There seems to be an event going on as he is waiving to others in the room that is highlighted in the reflection that is picked up in the mirror on the wall.  It is also signed by the artiest stating Van Eyck was here, like memorializing an event.  The discussion of light and technique of utilizing multiple layers of oil painting help create a vibrant ambiance as well as a love and appreciation of light that was popular in the times of the Northern renaissance.  The details of the intricate pictures within the picture may have been done by a single hair brush like the dog’s hair and the religious images that decorated the mirror.  The social implication of the artwork show that this couple is wealthy.  First off wealthy and important enough to have a portrait made, but the items in the portrait represent wealth.  The quality of clothing, the woven rug, breed of dog, oranges and their representation (Smarthistory, 2011) the marvelous chandelier with only one candle that also had religious implications.  All of these items show that the couple was wealthy.  One example of symbolism is the one candle that symbolized one higher power of God and its presence at this event being the only candle needed. 

The analysis versus my impression was a little different.  I did not pick up on the wealth aspect that the portrait was trying to portray.  I did notice the items but did not equate them with wealth.  I believed the woman to be pregnant, but in the break down it was a dress style of the times.  I also was not picking up on an event happening as I did not notice all the reflections in the mirror, but I noticed the uncomfortableness in the hand holding as he is holding the back of her hand.  I also noticed the lack of eye contact as they seems din engaged.  And the raising of his hand towards her as to stop her, My interpretation was of a couple that was not happy, that only had one candle, and lived in a small cramped area where the food was kept where they sleep.  I thought she was pregnant and he was possibly not happy about the situation.  After hearing the professionals discuss I can see I was way off.  

References:

Smarthistory. (2011, October 2). Van Eyck, portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his wife, 1434 (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/U38V_XwaRxM

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Global events | Nursing homework help

Global events | Nursing homework help

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ITS VERY IMPORTANT TO MEET THE COMPETENCES, PLS READ  THEM.

Write a 5–6 page, APA-formatted report that explains the responses to a global event, how issues of race, class, and gender may have affected the response, and the role of international and altruistic organizations in providing health care services related to the event. 

Describe barriers to receiving health care services related to the event, and explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to the global event.

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assessment criteria:

 

  • Competency 1: Explain the factors that affect the health of communities.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the response to a global event at the local and national levels.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain how social attitudes and issues of race, class, and/or gender may impact the response to a global event.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the role of international and altruistic organizations in providing health care services during a global event.
  • Competency 2: Apply evidence-based interventions to promote health and disease prevention and respond to community health issues.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to global events.
  • Competency 3: Develop an evidence-based nursing response for providing health care services related to community crises.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Describe barriers to health care services during a global event.
  • Competency 4: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for a nursing professional.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Write content clearly and logically with correct use of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Correctly format paper, citations, and references, using current APA style.

Assessment Instructions 

  

Preparation

Suppose that within your health care organization there is no formal process or structure for health care professionals to volunteer time and services in times of global need. You would like to develop a proposal for establishing a process that would allow nurses and other health care professionals to secure time off to work with a specific worldwide organization, to provide health care services during global events. As part of the proposal, you would need to provide background research to support your request.

Conduct background research on either one of the following to support the proposal you would develop:

  • Choose one worldwide epidemic, such as the 2009 flu pandemic, 2009 mumps outbreak, 2012 Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak, the recent Ebola virus epidemic, or another epidemic. Research articles that focus on how the initial outbreak was handled; the role of social attitudes and issues of race, class, and gender in responding to the outbreak; barriers to people receiving proper health care; and the role of nursing in providing health care services related to the epidemic.
  • Choose one natural disaster, such as the earthquakes in Haiti, Pakistan, or Nepal; Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar; the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, or any other natural disaster that brought a worldwide response. Research articles that focus on the initial response to the disaster; the role of social attitudes and issues of race, class, and gender in responding to the disaster; barriers to survivors receiving health care; and the role of nursing in providing health care services related to the disaster.

Requirements

For this assessment, develop background research that would support a proposal for an organizational process allowing health care professionals to volunteer time and services when global events happen. First, identify the global event you will be using in your research, and then:

  • Explain how the local and national (meaning the nation in which the event took place) communities responded to the event. Who responded? How long did the first response take? How did health care providers respond?
  • Explain how social attitudes, as well as issues of race, class, gender, or other factors may have influenced the response to the event. Be sure you consider not only the response of the home country, but the global response as well.
  • Describe barriers to health care services for the people impacted by the event. Some barriers may be obvious, and other barriers less obvious; try to consider multiple aspects.
  • Explain the role of international health organizations and altruistic organizations in providing health care services related to the global event.
  • Explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to the global event. Consider scope of practice when working professionally out of one’s area of license—either nationally or globally.

Additional Requirements

Complete your assessment using the following specifications:

  • Title page and reference page.
  • Number of pages: 5–6 (not  including the title and reference pages).
  • At least 4 current scholarly or professional resources.
  • APA format for the entire document, including citations and references.
  • Times New Roman font, 12-point, double-spaced.

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Global events | Nursing homework help

ITS VERY IMPORTANT TO MEET THE COMPETENCES, PLS READ  THEM.

Write a 5–6 page, APA-formatted report that explains the responses to a global event, how issues of race, class, and gender may have affected the response, and the role of international and altruistic organizations in providing health care services related to the event. 

Describe barriers to receiving health care services related to the event, and explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to the global event.

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assessment criteria:

 

  • Competency 1: Explain the factors that affect the health of communities.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the response to a global event at the local and national levels.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain how social attitudes and issues of race, class, and/or gender may impact the response to a global event.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the role of international and altruistic organizations in providing health care services during a global event.
  • Competency 2: Apply evidence-based interventions to promote health and disease prevention and respond to community health issues.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to global events.
  • Competency 3: Develop an evidence-based nursing response for providing health care services related to community crises.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Describe barriers to health care services during a global event.
  • Competency 4: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for a nursing professional.       
    • (IMPORTANT) -Write content clearly and logically with correct use of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics.
    • (IMPORTANT) -Correctly format paper, citations, and references, using current APA style.

Assessment Instructions 

  

Preparation

Suppose that within your health care organization there is no formal process or structure for health care professionals to volunteer time and services in times of global need. You would like to develop a proposal for establishing a process that would allow nurses and other health care professionals to secure time off to work with a specific worldwide organization, to provide health care services during global events. As part of the proposal, you would need to provide background research to support your request.

Conduct background research on either one of the following to support the proposal you would develop:

  • Choose one worldwide epidemic, such as the 2009 flu pandemic, 2009 mumps outbreak, 2012 Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak, the recent Ebola virus epidemic, or another epidemic. Research articles that focus on how the initial outbreak was handled; the role of social attitudes and issues of race, class, and gender in responding to the outbreak; barriers to people receiving proper health care; and the role of nursing in providing health care services related to the epidemic.
  • Choose one natural disaster, such as the earthquakes in Haiti, Pakistan, or Nepal; Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar; the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, or any other natural disaster that brought a worldwide response. Research articles that focus on the initial response to the disaster; the role of social attitudes and issues of race, class, and gender in responding to the disaster; barriers to survivors receiving health care; and the role of nursing in providing health care services related to the disaster.

Requirements

For this assessment, develop background research that would support a proposal for an organizational process allowing health care professionals to volunteer time and services when global events happen. First, identify the global event you will be using in your research, and then:

  • Explain how the local and national (meaning the nation in which the event took place) communities responded to the event. Who responded? How long did the first response take? How did health care providers respond?
  • Explain how social attitudes, as well as issues of race, class, gender, or other factors may have influenced the response to the event. Be sure you consider not only the response of the home country, but the global response as well.
  • Describe barriers to health care services for the people impacted by the event. Some barriers may be obvious, and other barriers less obvious; try to consider multiple aspects.
  • Explain the role of international health organizations and altruistic organizations in providing health care services related to the global event.
  • Explain the role of the professional nurse in providing health care services related to the global event. Consider scope of practice when working professionally out of one’s area of license—either nationally or globally.

Additional Requirements

Complete your assessment using the following specifications:

  • Title page and reference page.
  • Number of pages: 5–6 (not  including the title and reference pages).
  • At least 4 current scholarly or professional resources.
  • APA format for the entire document, including citations and references.
  • Times New Roman font, 12-point, double-spaced.

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Access | Computer Science homework help

Access | Computer Science homework help

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V475/I519 Assignment 10  
(30 points)

Conditional Macros, DLOOKUP, & Binding Values:

Download MoviesDB_with_Awards.accdb from Canvas. This is the Movies Database we have been using modified to include Award and Movie_Award tables. 

You will create three sub-menu forms in this assignment that will be accessed from a Main Menu.  Section 2 contains an option for bonus points. 

Objectives:

1. Create a form that rates a Star’s productivity

2. Allow user to select a Director and produce a list of Stars who have been directed by that director

3. Let’s see what you can do–Using the Awards data provided, you will create your own form where the user selects something and displays a result. 

Methods Involved:

· Conditional Macros and “Set Value” action

· DLOOKUP function

· Control pathname (e.g. forms!specific_form_name!control_name_on_form)

· Combo-Box (drop-down list on a Form) and “binding” a value 

· Autoexec macro that opens the Main Menu when Access starts

Create a simple Main Menu that opens when Access starts and links to all sub-menus. 

1. Create a form called Star_Productivity_frm. In this form, you will select a Movie Star and determine whether that Star had a productive career or not.
Your form might look like this:

 

Perform the following steps:
 

Create a query that COUNTs the number of movies the Stars have starred in. The results of this may be two columns: Starnum and MovieCount. Name the query “movstar_count_qry.”
 

Start with a blank form, add a Combo-Box . Bind its source to the Star table (show Starname, but bind the combo-box to Starnum).
 

Add a textbox control next to the form; call it “Productivity”.
 

Program a macro called Productivity_Rating. When the user picks a Starname from the combo-box , the macro will execute (select After Update event). The Macro will have two actions:
(1) (using DLOOKUP with IF statement) use the movstar_count_qry query that has the COUNT of the number of movies the chosen Star has starred in.
(2) set the value of the “Productivity” control as follows (less than 3= “Not Very Productive”, BETWEEN 3 and 6= “Moderately Productive”, and greater than 6=”Very productive”)
 

Close the movstar_count query window. Name the form “Star_Productivity_frm”  and be sure to test.  
 

2. Create a form called Director_Star_frm. In this exercise, you will select a Director and produce a list of Stars who have been directed by this Director.
 

On a blank form, add a Combo-Box.  Bind its source to the Director table (show DIRNAME, but bind the combo-box to DIRNUM).
 

Create a query called “Director_Star_qry” using control pathname in the query criteria that points to the combo-box you created above. This query will have two columns: Dirnum and Starname. Note: Use DISTINCT after the SELECT statement to remove duplicate results. {ie., SELECT DISTINCT …}
 

Place a Click-Button next to the Combo-box. When the button is clicked, a query is to run that will produce a list of all STARNAMES that the selected director has directed. Use a macro to open the query results in datasheet view. Name the form “Director_Star_frm.”
 

Your form might look like:


 

3. Let’s see what you can do…Using the Awards data provided in this file, create a form that displays Awards in any format and method of your choosing.  You should use some of the methods you have learned in the A & Ps and with this assignment to complete this task to receive full credit. Be creative in ways you might show awards information. 

BONUS POINTS Option: For Bonus Points, instead of using a button, add a sub-form to this form that displays the Stars who were directed by that Director. Your output could look like this:

Don’t worry about auto refresh here. I have not been able to get this to work in Access. Instead, you can create a button that does the Refresh, but the user must press that. You will need to add the term “Refresh” to a VBA script:
Ask me if you are not sure.

 

Be sure all of your buttons work from the Main Menu that link to the three sub-menus that you created. Add buttons on all your sub-menus that link back to the Main Menu. Your Main Menu should open when Access starts. (Reminder: create an autoexec macro)

Submit the completed ACCESS database on Canvas with this Assignment. 

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Access | Computer Science homework help

  

V475/I519 Assignment 10  
(30 points)

Conditional Macros, DLOOKUP, & Binding Values:

Download MoviesDB_with_Awards.accdb from Canvas. This is the Movies Database we have been using modified to include Award and Movie_Award tables. 

You will create three sub-menu forms in this assignment that will be accessed from a Main Menu.  Section 2 contains an option for bonus points. 

Objectives:

1. Create a form that rates a Star’s productivity

2. Allow user to select a Director and produce a list of Stars who have been directed by that director

3. Let’s see what you can do–Using the Awards data provided, you will create your own form where the user selects something and displays a result. 

Methods Involved:

· Conditional Macros and “Set Value” action

· DLOOKUP function

· Control pathname (e.g. forms!specific_form_name!control_name_on_form)

· Combo-Box (drop-down list on a Form) and “binding” a value 

· Autoexec macro that opens the Main Menu when Access starts

Create a simple Main Menu that opens when Access starts and links to all sub-menus. 

1. Create a form called Star_Productivity_frm. In this form, you will select a Movie Star and determine whether that Star had a productive career or not.
Your form might look like this:

 

Perform the following steps:
 

Create a query that COUNTs the number of movies the Stars have starred in. The results of this may be two columns: Starnum and MovieCount. Name the query “movstar_count_qry.”
 

Start with a blank form, add a Combo-Box . Bind its source to the Star table (show Starname, but bind the combo-box to Starnum).
 

Add a textbox control next to the form; call it “Productivity”.
 

Program a macro called Productivity_Rating. When the user picks a Starname from the combo-box , the macro will execute (select After Update event). The Macro will have two actions:
(1) (using DLOOKUP with IF statement) use the movstar_count_qry query that has the COUNT of the number of movies the chosen Star has starred in.
(2) set the value of the “Productivity” control as follows (less than 3= “Not Very Productive”, BETWEEN 3 and 6= “Moderately Productive”, and greater than 6=”Very productive”)
 

Close the movstar_count query window. Name the form “Star_Productivity_frm”  and be sure to test.  
 

2. Create a form called Director_Star_frm. In this exercise, you will select a Director and produce a list of Stars who have been directed by this Director.
 

On a blank form, add a Combo-Box.  Bind its source to the Director table (show DIRNAME, but bind the combo-box to DIRNUM).
 

Create a query called “Director_Star_qry” using control pathname in the query criteria that points to the combo-box you created above. This query will have two columns: Dirnum and Starname. Note: Use DISTINCT after the SELECT statement to remove duplicate results. {ie., SELECT DISTINCT …}
 

Place a Click-Button next to the Combo-box. When the button is clicked, a query is to run that will produce a list of all STARNAMES that the selected director has directed. Use a macro to open the query results in datasheet view. Name the form “Director_Star_frm.”
 

Your form might look like:


 

3. Let’s see what you can do…Using the Awards data provided in this file, create a form that displays Awards in any format and method of your choosing.  You should use some of the methods you have learned in the A & Ps and with this assignment to complete this task to receive full credit. Be creative in ways you might show awards information. 

BONUS POINTS Option: For Bonus Points, instead of using a button, add a sub-form to this form that displays the Stars who were directed by that Director. Your output could look like this:

Don’t worry about auto refresh here. I have not been able to get this to work in Access. Instead, you can create a button that does the Refresh, but the user must press that. You will need to add the term “Refresh” to a VBA script:
Ask me if you are not sure.

 

Be sure all of your buttons work from the Main Menu that link to the three sub-menus that you created. Add buttons on all your sub-menus that link back to the Main Menu. Your Main Menu should open when Access starts. (Reminder: create an autoexec macro)

Submit the completed ACCESS database on Canvas with this Assignment. 

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Unit 7 assignment simple linear

Unit 7 assignment simple linear

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Instructions

Develop: Regression Analysis

Evaluation Title: Simple Linear Regression

In this assignment, you will use linear regression to calculate the expected after exercising heart rate.

Steps

  1. Open the Heart Rate Dataset in Excel and identify the X-variable (resting) and the Y-variable (after exercise).
  2. Use the Scatter Plot function in the Insert Charts section of Excel to create a scatter plot of the X and Y variables
  3. Add a trendline to the scatter plot (Find and view a YouTube video on how to do this if you need help)
  4. Use the Data Analysis tools in Excel to perform a regression analysis on the X and Y variables.
  5. In a Word document, describe the relationship between the X-variable (rest heart rate)and the Y-variable (after exercise).  Make sure you include the following:
    • Scatter plot with a trend line
    • Estimates for the intercept
    • Slope coefficients

Additional Instructions:

Your assignment should be typed into a Word or other word processing document, formatted in APA style. The assignments must include

  • Running head
  • A title page with
    • Assignment name
    • Your name
    • Professor’s name
    • Course

Estimated time to complete: 3 hours

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Unit 7 assignment simple linear

 

Instructions

Develop: Regression Analysis

Evaluation Title: Simple Linear Regression

In this assignment, you will use linear regression to calculate the expected after exercising heart rate.

Steps

  1. Open the Heart Rate Dataset in Excel and identify the X-variable (resting) and the Y-variable (after exercise).
  2. Use the Scatter Plot function in the Insert Charts section of Excel to create a scatter plot of the X and Y variables
  3. Add a trendline to the scatter plot (Find and view a YouTube video on how to do this if you need help)
  4. Use the Data Analysis tools in Excel to perform a regression analysis on the X and Y variables.
  5. In a Word document, describe the relationship between the X-variable (rest heart rate)and the Y-variable (after exercise).  Make sure you include the following:
    • Scatter plot with a trend line
    • Estimates for the intercept
    • Slope coefficients

Additional Instructions:

Your assignment should be typed into a Word or other word processing document, formatted in APA style. The assignments must include

  • Running head
  • A title page with
    • Assignment name
    • Your name
    • Professor’s name
    • Course

Estimated time to complete: 3 hours

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Week 5 d 1 | Education homework help

Week 5 d 1 | Education homework help

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When working with children or adults, it is important to make sure that we remain professional. Often times when supporting children or adults, we will face ethical dilemmas. For example, sometimes you will know that a child is in need of services; however, because of the state and federal legislation you must follow, you will have to go with what is mandated. In this discussion you will have the opportunity to practice how you would handle an ethical dilemma based on a case study.

To prepare for this discussion,

· Please refer to the Week Five Guidance for further tips and examples that will support your success on this discussion.

· Read Chapter 7: Students Who Are Gifted and Talented.

· Read Chapter 8: Students With Intellectual Disabilities.

· Read Chapter 9: Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

· Choose one of the case studies from the Ethical Dilemmas in Inclusive Environments Case Studies interactive. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

In your post,

· Put the name of the child/adult in the case study in the subject line of your post.

· Describe how you would create an inclusive and supportive environment based on the needs of the individual in your chosen case study.

· Explain at least one ethical dilemma that you may encounter as you work to create an inclusive environment for the individual in your chosen case study.

· Propose a solution to the potential ethical dilemma you explained in the previous bullet. Support your proposal with Special Education Professional Ethical Principles (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

· Discuss how you would share your solution with others in order to become a leader in developing inclusive settings.

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Week 5 d 1 | Education homework help

  

When working with children or adults, it is important to make sure that we remain professional. Often times when supporting children or adults, we will face ethical dilemmas. For example, sometimes you will know that a child is in need of services; however, because of the state and federal legislation you must follow, you will have to go with what is mandated. In this discussion you will have the opportunity to practice how you would handle an ethical dilemma based on a case study.

To prepare for this discussion,

· Please refer to the Week Five Guidance for further tips and examples that will support your success on this discussion.

· Read Chapter 7: Students Who Are Gifted and Talented.

· Read Chapter 8: Students With Intellectual Disabilities.

· Read Chapter 9: Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

· Choose one of the case studies from the Ethical Dilemmas in Inclusive Environments Case Studies interactive. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

In your post,

· Put the name of the child/adult in the case study in the subject line of your post.

· Describe how you would create an inclusive and supportive environment based on the needs of the individual in your chosen case study.

· Explain at least one ethical dilemma that you may encounter as you work to create an inclusive environment for the individual in your chosen case study.

· Propose a solution to the potential ethical dilemma you explained in the previous bullet. Support your proposal with Special Education Professional Ethical Principles (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

· Discuss how you would share your solution with others in order to become a leader in developing inclusive settings.

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Discussion paper (person mapping) | Architecture and Design homework help

Discussion paper (person mapping) | Architecture and Design homework help

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 Subject: Security Architecture & Design

Please respond to BOTH of the following questions:

Question A

  •   Acknowledge at least two types of accounts that should not be mapped to a person; explain your reasoning.

Question B

Each week, research a unique news story or article related to Information Security/Information Technology. Post a summary of what you learned to the discussion thread, please also provide a link to the original article. Source is your choice; however please fully cite your source.

Please respond to the initial question by “Wednesday”, post should be 150 to 200 words, but may go longer depending on the topic.  (initial post, clearly present well-reasoned ideas and concepts). If you use any source outside of your own thoughts, you should reference that source. Include solid grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.

NO PLAGIARISM”

Learning Materials and References (Prof posted in course syllabus)

Required Resources

Shostack, Adam. Threat Modeling: Designing for Security, Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2014

Recommended Resources

Please use the following author’s names, book/article titles, Web sites, and/or keywords to search for supplementary information to augment your learning in this subject.

Tony UcedaVelez and Marco M. Morana

Rick Centric Threat Modeling: Process for Attack Simulation and Threat Analysis

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Discussion paper (person mapping) | Architecture and Design homework help

 Subject: Security Architecture & Design

Please respond to BOTH of the following questions:

Question A

  •   Acknowledge at least two types of accounts that should not be mapped to a person; explain your reasoning.

Question B

Each week, research a unique news story or article related to Information Security/Information Technology. Post a summary of what you learned to the discussion thread, please also provide a link to the original article. Source is your choice; however please fully cite your source.

Please respond to the initial question by “Wednesday”, post should be 150 to 200 words, but may go longer depending on the topic.  (initial post, clearly present well-reasoned ideas and concepts). If you use any source outside of your own thoughts, you should reference that source. Include solid grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.

NO PLAGIARISM”

Learning Materials and References (Prof posted in course syllabus)

Required Resources

Shostack, Adam. Threat Modeling: Designing for Security, Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2014

Recommended Resources

Please use the following author’s names, book/article titles, Web sites, and/or keywords to search for supplementary information to augment your learning in this subject.

Tony UcedaVelez and Marco M. Morana

Rick Centric Threat Modeling: Process for Attack Simulation and Threat Analysis

AD:

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